Half Vast Ideas

Bill Garvin HVI

Military veterans probably remember the maxim that “Proper prior planning prevents p— poor performance.” Civilian applications were politically corrected down to “prior planning prevents poor performance.” There are other colloquialisms for caution such as “don’t let your mouth write a check that your body can’t cash” and don’t let your alligator mouth overload your hummingbird butt.” My favorite has to be “don’t take on vast projects with half-vast ideas.” Apparently, the Obama administration never heard or has chosen to ignore these maxims.

Of course, when you start with a flawed premise, there is very little room for success. How could any sane person possibly believe you can add thirty million people to the medical rolls, suffer a status quo or decrease in medical practitioners, mandate a plethora of additional benefits in every policy, and expect your insurance bill to decrease by $2,500 per family per year? Yet, that’s what President Obama promised and Democrats and the media swallowed it, hook, line and sinker. It was shoved down the throats of the remainder, the majority of citizens, who have never approved of Obamacare, who were satisfied with their own insurance, and were pleased with their medical care.
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Gene’s Nickle: Bill of Rights

Can elected politicians or self-appointed leaders ever be fully trusted? Historically, the answer appears to be no!

Our Founders, mindful of this thought, spent four long months in 1787, proposing, debating, wrangling, arguing, threatening, and compromising until they hammered out a fix to the Articles of Confederation, a new Constitution. A constitution that limited the affects a politician could inflict on the population.

The Constitution spelled out limited “enumerated powers” the new government would have. However, it only listed a few specific, protected rights citizens would enjoy: protections of habeas corpus, from bills of attainder, and from ex post facto laws.

A serious debate surrounded the Constitution’s ratification: whether specific rights and liberties needed to be listed. Ratification proponents argued that citizen’s rights were protected by the constitutional limitations put on government. Opponents countered that governments, or at least the individuals governing, couldn’t be trusted; rights needed to be recorded.
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A Fluke in Our Midst

Mark Stein has written another great piece at National Review Online, titled “A Nation of Sandra Flukes”. He begins his article:

According to Georgetown Law student Sandra Fluke, invited to address the Democratic convention and the nation, America faces a stark choice this November. “During this campaign, we’ve heard about two profoundly different futures that could await women in this country — and how one of those futures looks like an offensive, obsolete relic of our past,” she cautioned. “That future could become real.”
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Gibson Guitar Caves, Accepts DOJ Deal

Per the PJ Tatler:

Gibson Guitar Corp. agreed to settle charges that it illegally purchased and imported ebony wood from Madagascar and rosewood and ebony from India, the Justice Department said today.

The company will pay a $300,000 fine under a criminal enforcement agreement that defers prosecution for criminal violations of the Lacey Act. Another $50,000 fine will go to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation “to be used to promote the conservation, identification and propagation of protected tree species used in the musical instrument industry and the forests where those species are found.”

Since May 2008, it has been illegal under the Lacey Act to import into the United States plants and plant products that have been harvested and exported in violation of the laws of another country. Raids of Gibson factories by federal authorities led to concerns from some guitar owners that they could also be found in violation and pursued for having instruments made of illegal wood.

Last August, Gibson officials accused the government of “bullying” the company. “Gibson has complied with foreign laws and believes it is innocent of any wrong doing. We will fight aggressively to prove our innocence.”

Under the agreement with the Justice and Interior departments, Gibson will also withdraw its civil claim to retrieve $261,844 worth of Madagascar ebony seized in a raid.

You can read the rest HERE.

A ruling on the Dunes Sagebrush lizard is due this week

From the Las Cruzes Sun-News:

A day of decision is finally near for the West’s most-publicized reptile.

The Obama administration probably will announce Thursday if the dunes sagebrush lizard will be listed as an endangered species, said Tom Buckley, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Albuquerque.

An occupant of wind-swept dunes in oil country, the lizard exists only in four counties of southeastern New Mexico and four others in West Texas.

Buckley said today the announcement on the lizard’s status probably would be made in Washington. He expects either Interior Secretary Ken Salazar or Daniel Ashe, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, to make the finding public.

Debate over whether the lizard should receive federal protection has raged for 18 months. Ashe in December postponed his scheduled ruling on lizard, saying he wanted another six months to consider scientific data.

The critter in question isn’t much bigger than your garden variety lizard and, living in Texas, lizards and gheckos are everywhere this year. We had a very mild winter and the insect population is way up since we never got a sustained, hard freeze. As a result of the insect boom, reptiles are finding plentiful food and their population is up too. I’ve rarely been able to sit on the back patio during the day without a lizard scampering across the patio right in front of me. The dogs don’t even pay attention to them anymore!

I’m planning on a trip to West Texas later in July to see for myself what all the fuss is about. I’ll report back with my findings!

U.S. Fish Wildlife Service: Species Profile


Hat Tip: Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion